The baldie is fled, long live the baldie!

The business (basically a CRM database) passed into better hands in 2012. These materials remain here for cannibalisation and amusement.

The baldie meanwhile has found pastures new: as a singing organ-grinder for your event in the UK, France, Belgium, the Netherlands or Spain!

 
FollowTheBaldie.com: Town and country walking and study tours in Barcelona and the Western Med
  • Cruise & weekend favourites
    • in 4 hours without feeling like a stupid tourist.
  • Theme browser
  • Fiesta finder
  • Why FollowTheBaldie?
    • Language All our guides are native English speakers and speak the local language fluently.
    • Knowledge Our local and subject knowledge is profound and up-to-date.
    • Interactivity See someone interesting? We'll interpret. Tired/full of energy? We can adapt the programme.
    • Individuality We don't do herd tourism. No silly flags. No headsets.
    • Responsibility Unlike most "green" tour businesses, we only use public transport--cheaper and generally more interesting.

Time to introduce urban hunting in Barcelona?

Posted by admin on Monday September 6th 2010. Comment now

There's a lovely bit in Isaiah 13 describing the ruin and desolation of Babylon:

And Babylon, the glory of kingdoms, the beauty of the Chaldees' excellency, shall be as when God overthrew Sodom and Gomorrah.
It shall never be inhabited, neither shall it be dwelt in from generation to generation: neither shall the Arabian pitch tent there; neither shall the shepherds make their fold there.
But wild beasts of the desert shall lie there; and their houses shall be full of doleful creatures; and owls shall dwell there, and satyrs shall dance there.
And the wild beasts of the islands shall cry in their desolate houses, and dragons in their pleasant palaces: and her time is near to come, and her days shall not be prolonged.

Lieutenant James Graydon RN, George Borrow's colleague in these parts, obviously didn't sell enough Bibles in the vernacular, because it doesn't seem to have occurred to witnesses of the following incursion by a sounder (not a family) of boars from this walk on the Collserola hills behind Barcelona to this Gracia walk, near Plaza Lesseps, presumably making use of the 2-mile on-the-way-to-being-a-green-corridor created by Park Güell, Monte Carmelo and the Creueta del Coll, to draw a parallel between Babylon and Barcelona:

Unfortunately for opposition parties of a Christian bent fighting the regional elections in November, the increasing presence of ex-wild beasts in Barcelona has been accompanied by a slight rise, rather than a dramatic fall, in population:

The doleful creatures, satyrs, and dragons in pleasant palaces might be considered a fair reflection of Mayors Hereu and Clos' troubled reign, were this problem not common to many Western cities. In a piece in the FT during the great London fox hoohaa in June Frederick Studemann issued a bold call for the introduction of urban hunts, on foot if need be:

For the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition, the urban hunt would be a vehicle for the localism, the grass-roots engagement, that both parties are so keen to animate. The rallying call of the Streatham Chase, the Peckham Ryde or the Ham & High Quorn would draw on long-buried local loyalties, revealing the pull of the ancient underlying villages that define London.

Neighbourhood rivalry would soon turn the hunts into colourful and profitable civic pageants similar to Sienna’s Palio horse race. With income from hunting licences, local councils could make good some of the revenue they will lose as Mr Cameron cuts their budgets.

That's probably even less likely to happen in Barcelona than repeal of the selective ban on bull-fighting, but there is precedent, and in this particular location: I read somewhere ages ago (sorry, ref) that following a wolf-hunt on Collserola in 1879 a wolf took refuge in the chapel which stood next to the old Convent of the Josepets before the construction of Avenida de la República Argentina and Plaza Lesseps. The locals found it there, and ignoring the Carmelite tradition of peace and quiet, beat it to death and then put it on public display with an entry price of eight and a half quarters. The good thing about piglets is that you can take them home and eat them.

RSS: post comments, blog comments, blog posts

Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed.


Legal · Sitemap · Song · Cartoon · © 2004-19 · Guide login
Note for travel agents
Sample tours